The Emperor’s New Clothes (TENC) * www.tenc.net 

Please send this link to a friend. You may post any TENC article on the internet as long as you credit TENC and the author(s).
http://emperors-clothes.com/archive/times410326.htm

Subscribe to the TENC Newsletter – Receive articles from Emperor's Clothes. To join, send a blank email to:
join-emperorsclothes@pr2.netatlantic.com
Then, just reply to the confirmation email.

=============================================

What does the world owe the people of Serbia?

In 1941 the New York Times article that is scanned below described how the people of Serbia and Montenegro rebelled, demanding war against the ‘unstoppable’ German Nazi juggernaut. The world held its collective breath.

The date mentioned in (some) history books is March 27, 1941.  But perhaps the more important date is March 26th.

In the article "NATO Stages a War Provocation in the Balkans," I wrote that in 1990, as they launched their second effort in 50 years to breakup Yugoslavia, the German establishment and the Vatican were fully aware that it was the Serbs who had opposed their earlier alliances, standing up to the Hapsburg Empire and then to Nazi Germany, whose ability to wage war depended on the support of clerical-fascist parties and movements in the European states - most obviously but not only Croatia, Slovakia and the Baltic states - and outside Europe as well.

In 1990, the German establishment and the Vatican (now supported by the US) knew that if they were going to again mobilize the regional forces that Nazi Germany had relied on to destroy Yugoslavia, they had to 'neutralize' the Serbian people, the glue of Yugoslavia. The Serbs had to be physically attacked and slandered in the world media as the supposed 'new Nazis.' In order to sell this lie, in their endless reporting on the Balkans the media had to omit the complicating fact that the people of Serbia and Montenegro had rebelled against their own government in order to oppose the Nazi alliance early in World War II.

As posted below, the New York Times of March 27, 1941 reported that, on March 26th, following many days of massive demonstrations while the Yugoslav government vacillated over whether and how much to surrender to Nazi Germany, the Serbian and Montenegrin populations rose up. With the active participation of the Orthodox church, they demanded an end to a government that, on March 25th, had finally and entirely caved in to the Nazis. They demanded war against the fascist Axis powers that had, until then, marched unimpeded across Europe. In response to this passionate popular revolt, on March 27th the Yugoslav Air Force overthrew the capitulationist government.

These events electrified a world that had come to fear that the Nazis were unstoppable.  And they infuriated Adolf Hitler, who, on March 26th, had begun critical talks with Japanese Foreign Minister Yosuke Matsuoka. As the New York Times reported in several articles [1], Japan was unwilling to declare war on Britain unless Yugoslavia was definitely in the German camp.

Hitler responded to the March 27th coup d'état - and to the mass demonstrations that inspired, accompanied and followed the coup - by ordering the invasion of Yugoslavia.  In order to invade Yugoslavia, he had to postpone the invasion of the Soviet Union. This delay meant that the Nazi army got caught in the deadly Russian winter, a disaster for the Nazis.  Therefore, it is reasonably argued that the events described below - the actions the people of Serbia and Montenegro took in March of 1941- made the defeat of Nazism possible.

So what do we owe these people who shook the world, and who later paid a terrible price in blood? [2] Not too much...

Here is the March 26th report.

-- Jared Israel
Editor, Emperor’s Clothes

=============================================

The following article was scanned from the New York Times of March 27, 1941. For the text version, transcribed without alteration from the original, go to
http://tenc.net/a/times410326-t.htm

Copyright the New York Times Company * Printed for Fair Use Only * For Educational Purposes

[Posted Oct. 19, 2007]

=============================================

 

=======================================

Footnotes and Further Reading

=======================================

-- For more Emperor's Clothes articles on Yugoslavia, go to
http://emperors-clothes.com/yugo.htm

[1] In March 1941, the New York Times published several articles that referred to Tokyo's conviction that Yugoslavia was strategically key and its consequent concern over the events culminating in the coup d'état of March 27, 1941, which occurred while Foreign Minister Matsuoka was in Berlin.  Here is a brief report of what was being said in Tokyo the day after the Yugoslav coup.
-- Jared Israel

[Full transcript of report on Tokyo's reaction to coup d'état starts here]

(C) The New York Times, Reprinted for Fair Use and Educational Purposes Only

Some Dismay in Tokyo

Wireless to THE NEW YORK TIMES
[Published, March 29, 1941, page 6]

TOKYO, Saturday, March 29 -
The dramatic turnabout of Yugoslavia at a moment when  Germany is anxious to demonstrate to Yosuke Matsuoka, Japanese Foreign Minister, how united Europe is against Britain is being viewed in Japan with some dismay, but with all the greater attention. The press agrees that while the ultimate outcome is still in doubt, it might, in the words of the newspaper Asahi, produce "some unforeseen disaster in Southeastern Europe."

The Japan Times-Advertiser explains that the German "Blitz" method has apparently been replaced by a glacier movement that "slowly and inevitably replaces the old order of completely independent States by a Reich union of European nations." But, it adds, the fall of the Yugoslav Government that signed the Axis pact "is extremely important news and likely to change the whole course of events in Asia Minor."

[Full transcript of report on Tokyo's reaction to coup d'état ends here]

[2] See the article “Jasenovac,” in Encyclopedia of the Holocaust, published by Yad Vashem in 1990, posted on Emperor's Clothes at
http://tenc.net/croatia/encr.htm#III

* * *


Please send this link to a friend. You may post any TENC article on the internet as long as you credit TENC and the author(s).
http://emperors-clothes.com/archive/times410326.htm

Subscribe to the TENC Newsletter – Receive articles from Emperor's Clothes. To join, send a blank email to:
join-emperorsclothes@pr2.netatlantic.com
Then, just reply to the confirmation email.

Our readers make TENC possible. Please donate!

The Emperor’s New Clothes (TENC) * www.tenc.net